Tag Archives: B2B marketing

Lessons from the (Marketing) Garden: Make a Plan!

Over the Christmas break, in between the sprouts and mince pies, I started to think about my vegetable plot at the bottom of my garden. Those who know me well will know that I’m a keen gardener – I say keen rather than good, since I garden with more enthusiasm than competence!

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5 Steps towards Customer Intimacy through Marketing Data

All of a sudden it’s very trendy to talk about data and analytics. Of course there’s very good reasons for this – the data that you capture potentialy provide an enormous amount of insight about a client’s actual and likely behaviour. However most of us are failing to capitalise on this potential.

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Organic Gardener’s Guide to Lead Nurturing – 2009 Edition

It’s taken me a couple of weeks, but I’ve finally posted my presentation from the B2B Marketing Magazine seminar on Demand Generation/Lead Nurturing onto Slideshare. I hope you find it useful. It contains 10 areas to focus on to improve the yield on your marketing campaigns.

You can also find the deck from Will Schnabel at Silverpop here

2009’s Top 50 Marketing Blogs

There’s always a plethora of lists of “this years blogs to watch” around this time of the year. I just stumbled across one from Evan Carmichael (a new author to me – but creating lists is always a good way of promoting your profile in the blogosphere). Some old faithfuls in here (Seth Godin, Marketing Sherpa, Guy Kawasaki) plus several that I’ve not come across before. Helpfully they’ve divided them in to different sections.

What additional ones would make your list of must-read blogs – particularly in the B2B space?

Personally I would add Chris Brogan, Marketing Profs Daily Fix and Web Ink Now for starters.

An Organic Gardener’s Guide to Lead Nurturing

Yesterday I spoke at a seminar organised by B2B Marketing magazine. Rather than use the traditional analogies of dating/marriage that we all use to describe the nurturing approach, I used the topic of vegetable gardening (it’s the new rock’n’roll!).

Marketing campaigns produce seedlings, but that’s only the start – we need to feed, weed, water, prick out etc at the appropriate time. We also need to ensure that the sales teams want to eat vegetables and are not just red meat eaters. You get the picture?

So my 9 tips for a bumper marketing crop have now become:

  1. Grow the right stuff (Align marketing activity with Sales)
  2. What’s growing and What isn’t (Record all your Responses in a client contact-centric view)
  3. Follow the instructions on the Seed Packet (Develop “nurturing blueprints” of standardised processes to develop a relationship from an initial response)
  4. Apply the right Feed at the right time (Align your nurturing content to the stages of the buying cycle)
  5. Are the nutrients being absorbed? (Implement activity-based scoring)
  6. Make it easier with a little machinery (Automate the most appropriate processes)
  7. Share your knowledge (Integrate your marketing insights with the CRM system)
  8. Monitor Progress Regularly (Measure key indicators)
  9. Apply plenty of Mulch (Refine and keep learning)

You can find the complete presentation on Slideshare.

Flickr Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tico_bassie/120810354/

5 Ways to make B2B Lead Management more Effective

Catching up on some reading today I came across this article from the ITSMA – an interview with the excellent Brian Carroll. It offers the following common sense advice to improve your lead management:

  1. Create a marketing funnel
  2. Create a universal definition of a lead
  3. Use the phone
  4. Ask about goals – don’t sell
  5. Define lead nurturing – and the right people to nurture

All good stuff – you can read the full article here.

Are you a Marketing Fundamentalist?

I’ve often spoken about how I feel that the 2 qualities that I consider that the best marketers possess are PASSION and CURIOSITY.

Passion is infectious – if you feel strongly about something then it’s obvious. You talk with enthusiasm, you’re excitement shines through, and you inspire others.In my work life my two main passions are lead nurturing and social networking. Lead nurturing has become a passion because I realised that a focus on improving the dialog that we have as marketers AFTER we’ve run the event or sent the email campaign could have a profound effect on our performance. And my passion for social networking is driven by the hope that technology could finally be used to help unite people both at work and in their broader lives.

If you can’t find something in your job to get passionate about, then perhaps you should think about trying some other job – your days must just drag along with monotony and mediocrity

Both of these passions have been developed as a result of Curiosity. Twelve months ago I did not feel as excited by either of these areas. However by exploring what is possible and taking an informed view on  what could work for me (and what couldn’t right now) by passion is stronger. Consequently I feel I could not operate without RSS and the world of Blogs, but am less enthused (for now) about Twitter, Facebook and SecondLife – however I will remain curious.

Last week I came across this 5 minute video featuring Seth Godin via a colleague. For me, what he says about Curiosity resonated very powerfully.

By the fact that you’re even looking at this, I guess your demonstrating that you’re at least somewhat curious!

Ring Out the Old, Ring In the New

I was reading extracts from the Tapscott and Williams’ fabulous Wikinomics book just before Christmas (Chapter 1 is available for free online), and much of it has been on my mind ever since.

Wikinomics does a great job (in my opinion) of setting out the difference between the old corporate business model and the new collaborative model which is evolving. I’ve tried to paraphrase the key points below about the key attributes of the different models:

Old World

  • Knowledge is Power (It’s your key corporate or career differentiator – so protect it all costs)
  • Hierarchical Management Structures (use organisation charts to to define teams – and expand to matrix management when that becomes too rigid)
  • Command and Control management system. Heavy emphasis on measurement and reporting, especially when the going gets tough)
  • Bestowed authority. (I’m the manager, so I know best.)
  • Routes to success
    • Employ brighter people than your competitors
    • Protect intellectual capital
    • Focus on customers
    • Think global, act local
    • Execution excellence

New World

  • Community is Power. A united community will be stronger than any individual
  • Collaboration. Openly sharing the knowledge we have and collaborating to apply that knowledge will deliver greater innovation
  • Self-Organisation. Teaming together because we buy into a common vision allows us to reach outside of the conventional hierarchical structure.
  • Earned Authority. Authority comes from the value you contribute,not from the rank you’ve been assigned
  • Routes to Success
    • Being Open
    • Peering
    • Sharing
    • Acting Globally

I particularly like these 4 suggested routes to success in the New World, and will aspire to apply them to my behaviour at work in 2008.

Happy New Year – I look forward to working and learning with you in 2008.

Pete

Use of Social Networking within the Marketing Department

We’ve just launched an initiative within our Marketing department amongst our new graduate hires. We’ve asked them to run a project looking at the way our marketing community communicates/shares with each other internally. Our sense is that leveraging Social Networking internally we will increase our understanding of how best to apply it to external marketing activity.

Initially we’ve asked them to look at some of the social networking technologies that are not broadly used within our marketing communities today (eg Facebook, Linked-In, Twitter, Wikis, Internal and External Blogs, etc) and combine that with the way that they expect to live in the digital world. Hopefully they may be able to come up with a few pointers for us all that would be more engaging (from their perspective as well as ours) than email and Conference Calls.

Are there lessons that this team could learn from your own experiences and approaches? Are there additional tools or communities that they should link to?